Category Archives: Places

The colonial past of the East: How India looked like at the end of the the 19th century

Snake Charmers, India 1889

Snake charmers, India, 1889

India, at the end of the 19th century, was dependent relations with the British Empire and the East India Company, a joint-stock company, formed in 1617 by Britain and England to pursue trades specifically with East India. India then, even now, in most of its cities, is known to be nation of extreme poverty, lack of sanitation, high mortality, colonial exploitation, and massive disparities between the wealthy and poor.

However, when the British came, they claimed themselves as enlighteners of the East and regarded Western culture as the superior one. Britain opened India to the industrial revolution and raised the level of education in the country. Railways, canals, telegraph — all these inventions were introduced immediately as they first appeared in Western countries.

Having learned the history of French and American colonies in newly built schools, many Indians soon began to understand that they, too, can fight for democracy and freedom.

H.R.H the prince of Wales and an Elephant, Terai.

H.R.H. The Prince of Wales and an elephant, Terai, 1875-1876

The East India Company was a major player at cotton, silk, indigo dye, saltpeter, and tea trading markets. In an attempt to break Chinese monopoly, tea was introduced into India at the end of the 19th century.  The British government was giving out the land of Assam, the Indian state, to any European, who agreed to cultivate tea for export. At the time, only Europeans and Europeanized Indians consumed tea until the Indian Tea Board conducted a successful advertising campaign in the 1920’s.

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Tea pickers in the Himalayas, India, 1890.

The tradition of Royal Hunt emerged when the Mughal Emperor Jalal-ud-Din Muhammad Akbar ruled the Mughal Empire in the 16th century. He had a passion for so-called ‘big game.’ Later, it became a favorite entertainment for the Rajas, since it was a showcase of bravery, power, and wealth with a tiger being the ultimate trophy.

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Hunters, 1875.

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A shooting party in Camp Srinuggar, Kashmir. 1964.

The controversy about the impact of the The East India Company to the natives of India does not cease to this day. Generally, colonization inevitably brings a lot of suffering to its subjects. However, even if some viewed it to be economic exploitation, the colonization brought an industrial revolution to this country.

Article courtesy: Picryl

Collection: India under British Rule

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Black & White photographs of life in India in the 70’s

New York 1936 – 1951

 

Four Union Soldiers Atop Lookout Mountain, Tennessee

 Photo shows soldiers who posed for the Linns, who left Ohio to photograph the Army of the Cumberland. In late 1863, after the battles of Lookout Mountain and Missionary Ridge, the pair set up a studio near Point Lookout. Here they photographed the western Union armies as they concentrated for an advance on Atlanta.


Photo shows soldiers who posed for the Linns, who left Ohio to photograph the Army of the Cumberland. In late 1863, after the battles of Lookout Mountain and Missionary Ridge, the pair set up a studio near Point Lookout. Here they photographed the western Union armies as they concentrated for an advance on Atlanta.

A marriage palace in Leningrad, 1959

In Leningrad the florid stairs of Tchaikovsky march filled the old palace of the czar’s cousin, Prince Andrei Romanov, as a happy couple mounted the deeply carpeted stairway to the elaborate hall where they would be married. Except for the informal dress, the wedding of Elena Pogorelova and Nikolai Smolin might have been a scene in the czarist Russia. It was, ironically, the newest in the “socialist” marriages.

Previously the Communists required civil marriages to be businesslike and perfunctory. But since many comrades missed the ceremony and ritual of church weddings, the government decided to add a bit of romance. The Leningrad “Marriage Palace” is the nation’s first, but many others are planned. In the palace’s waiting rooms Elena and Nikolai could enjoy piped-in music before hearing the speeches at their warm-hearted ceremony. A pleasant room was provided afterwards for a champagne reception. Some 500 couples a month have come to be married at the palace and hear the council member admonish, “I wish you happiness and love. Complete happiness is impossible without creative labor for your country.”

Amazing photos of an intense fire-fight in Vietnam, 1970

Vietnam War veteran James Speed Hensinger has released incredible night-time photographs he took of American troops opening fire on a Viet Cong sniper who had been firing on a U.S. Army camp. Hensinger was just a 22-year-old paratrooper with the 173rd Airborne Brigade in April 1970 when a Viet Cong sniper began spraying automatic rifle fire on Hensinger’s base in Phu Tai, near the coastal city of Da Nang.

For more than four decades, Hensinger kept these incredible photographs to himself, not releasing them to the public until now. “We were pissed off at taking Viet Cong sniper fire from the mountain above us several nights in a row. The guy would stand up from behind a rock and blow off a clip from his AK47 on full-auto. The sniper was shooting at such a high angle that most of his rounds came through the sheet metal roofs of our hooches. We decided to use a ‘heavy’ response the next time the sniper hit us.” He recalls.

After the massive attack, Hensinger says, “We sent out patrols during the day, and found a blood trail one morning. Otherwise, we never found him.”